FDA hasn’t authorized a two-minute test for coronavirus

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

A California company falsely claimed cargo planes were ready to ship millions of blood tests that could detect the new coronavirus in just two minutes and had won emergency authorization from the federal government

FDA hasn’t authorized a two-minute test for coronavirus

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

A California company falsely claimed cargo planes were ready to ship millions of blood tests that could detect the new coronavirus in just two minutes and had won emergency authorization from the federal government

West Virginia governor’s coal companies to pay $5M in fines

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

Billionaire West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice’s coal companies have agreed to pay more than $5 million for thousands of mine safety violations,

West Virginia governor’s coal companies to pay $5M in fines

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

Billionaire West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice’s coal companies have agreed to pay more than $5 million for thousands of mine safety violations,

A Port of Los Angeles train engineer is charged with stealing locomotive, crashing it near the hospital ship Mercy.

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

A Port of Los Angeles train engineer is charged with stealing locomotive, crashing it near the hospital ship Mercy.

A Port of Los Angeles train engineer is charged with stealing locomotive, crashing it near the hospital ship Mercy.

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

A Port of Los Angeles train engineer is charged with stealing locomotive, crashing it near the hospital ship Mercy.

Trump: US to deploy anti-drug Navy ships near Venezuela

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

President Donald Trump says Navy ships are being moved toward Venezuela as his administration beefs up counter-narcotics operations in the Caribbean following a U.S. drug indictment against Nicolás Maduro

Trump: US to deploy anti-drug Navy ships near Venezuela

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

President Donald Trump says Navy ships are being moved toward Venezuela as his administration beefs up counter-narcotics operations in the Caribbean following a U.S. drug indictment against Nicolás Maduro

Newspaper delivery man and his family bring groceries to seniors amid coronavirus

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

Courtesy Erin Dailey(TRENTON, N.J.) — At a time when countless Americans are relying on local heroes to stay safe, Greg Dailey and his family are stepping up.

Dailey is a small business owner and newspaper delivery man in Mercer County, New Jersey. Virtually every day for the past 25 years, he’s woken up at 4 a.m. to deliver newspapers to 800 homes in his community. But since the novel coronavirus shutdowns began, Dailey has been delivering more than newspapers — he’s delivering groceries, too.

“These are unprecedented times and people still have to eat,” said Dailey. “We’re a big family that believes in helping each other.”

The idea struck Dailey a few days before the novel coronavirus shutdowns began. Phyllis Ross, an 88-year-old costumer on his paper route, asked if he could drop her newspaper closer to her garage to limit the amount of time she was outside. Then it hit him.

“I went to the store and I thought to myself, ‘How in the world is she going to get groceries,'” said Dailey.

He called up Ross and asked if she needed any supplies from the store, which she took as a godsend.

“We were absolutely floored when he called,” said Ross. “At my age, I’m afraid to go into a store.”

Ross also asked on the call if he could pick up a few things for a neighbor across the street, which convinced Dailey there was a need in his community that someone had to fill.

“If those two people live 100 feet from each other, what about the other 800 people I deliver to?” Dailey asked.

The next day Dailey made the rounds as usual and added a personal note to each newspaper, offering to pick up groceries and household essentials free of charge for anyone who needed it. Before long, Dailey had more phone calls than he knew what to do with.

“Within a few hours, it became clear the need was overwhelming,” Dailey said.

It was all-hands-on-deck at the Dailey household. Daughter, Erin, 24, began organizing the orders into an Excel sheet. Dailey’s wife, Cherlyn, 48, ordered items ahead to save time. Sons, Sean, 21, and Brian, 16, were enlisted to carry groceries.

The Dailey clan began their task March 21 and, as of Wednesday, had delivered groceries to at least 52 homes in need. They normally spend seven hours each day compiling lists, shopping, disinfecting items and, most importantly, delivering.

“Everyone is so grateful,” said Dailey. “It’s one of the most rewarding things I’ve ever done in my life. You can just feel the energy from folks when they open the door.”

The Daileys’ hard work comes as a sign of the times as the coronavirus pandemic continues to spark fear in the hearts of many elderly Americans. People over the age of 65 are at particularly high risk of severe illness from COVID-19 and should not leave their homes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

But at the same time, costumers on Dailey’s route explain how difficult it can be to follow those guidelines without relying on help from others. Joanne Maddox, 76, said she and her husband tried to order groceries online, and had a five-day wait until their order could be processed. Five days turned into six, then seven, until the company canceled their order altogether.

“It’s incredibly unreliable,” Maddox said. “Greg has been a life saver.”

Ross paints a similar picture. She explained that few stores in their community offer fresh fruits and vegetables online, and many have orders backlogged for weeks. Since her kids live in a different state, Ross and her husband have limited options to get what they need to survive.

“It’s very scary and we really do need the help,” said Ross. “Greg is a kind and thoughtful person, and we are all so appreciative of his good deeds.”

The need is so great that Dailey now finds himself delivering groceries to homes outside of his usual newspaper route, going the extra mile for everyone that he can. It might seem like never-ending work, but Erin said the smiles on faces makes it all worth it.

“You can’t have a better feeling knowing these people are really desperate for help and you’re doing something so small, but it’s huge in their lives,” said Erin. “It’s rewarding to be a part of the relief.”

Dailey and his family plan to continue delivering groceries to their community as long as necessary.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Newspaper delivery man and his family bring groceries to seniors amid coronavirus

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

Courtesy Erin Dailey(TRENTON, N.J.) — At a time when countless Americans are relying on local heroes to stay safe, Greg Dailey and his family are stepping up.

Dailey is a small business owner and newspaper delivery man in Mercer County, New Jersey. Virtually every day for the past 25 years, he’s woken up at 4 a.m. to deliver newspapers to 800 homes in his community. But since the novel coronavirus shutdowns began, Dailey has been delivering more than newspapers — he’s delivering groceries, too.

“These are unprecedented times and people still have to eat,” said Dailey. “We’re a big family that believes in helping each other.”

The idea struck Dailey a few days before the novel coronavirus shutdowns began. Phyllis Ross, an 88-year-old costumer on his paper route, asked if he could drop her newspaper closer to her garage to limit the amount of time she was outside. Then it hit him.

“I went to the store and I thought to myself, ‘How in the world is she going to get groceries,'” said Dailey.

He called up Ross and asked if she needed any supplies from the store, which she took as a godsend.

“We were absolutely floored when he called,” said Ross. “At my age, I’m afraid to go into a store.”

Ross also asked on the call if he could pick up a few things for a neighbor across the street, which convinced Dailey there was a need in his community that someone had to fill.

“If those two people live 100 feet from each other, what about the other 800 people I deliver to?” Dailey asked.

The next day Dailey made the rounds as usual and added a personal note to each newspaper, offering to pick up groceries and household essentials free of charge for anyone who needed it. Before long, Dailey had more phone calls than he knew what to do with.

“Within a few hours, it became clear the need was overwhelming,” Dailey said.

It was all-hands-on-deck at the Dailey household. Daughter, Erin, 24, began organizing the orders into an Excel sheet. Dailey’s wife, Cherlyn, 48, ordered items ahead to save time. Sons, Sean, 21, and Brian, 16, were enlisted to carry groceries.

The Dailey clan began their task March 21 and, as of Wednesday, had delivered groceries to at least 52 homes in need. They normally spend seven hours each day compiling lists, shopping, disinfecting items and, most importantly, delivering.

“Everyone is so grateful,” said Dailey. “It’s one of the most rewarding things I’ve ever done in my life. You can just feel the energy from folks when they open the door.”

The Daileys’ hard work comes as a sign of the times as the coronavirus pandemic continues to spark fear in the hearts of many elderly Americans. People over the age of 65 are at particularly high risk of severe illness from COVID-19 and should not leave their homes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

But at the same time, costumers on Dailey’s route explain how difficult it can be to follow those guidelines without relying on help from others. Joanne Maddox, 76, said she and her husband tried to order groceries online, and had a five-day wait until their order could be processed. Five days turned into six, then seven, until the company canceled their order altogether.

“It’s incredibly unreliable,” Maddox said. “Greg has been a life saver.”

Ross paints a similar picture. She explained that few stores in their community offer fresh fruits and vegetables online, and many have orders backlogged for weeks. Since her kids live in a different state, Ross and her husband have limited options to get what they need to survive.

“It’s very scary and we really do need the help,” said Ross. “Greg is a kind and thoughtful person, and we are all so appreciative of his good deeds.”

The need is so great that Dailey now finds himself delivering groceries to homes outside of his usual newspaper route, going the extra mile for everyone that he can. It might seem like never-ending work, but Erin said the smiles on faces makes it all worth it.

“You can’t have a better feeling knowing these people are really desperate for help and you’re doing something so small, but it’s huge in their lives,” said Erin. “It’s rewarding to be a part of the relief.”

Dailey and his family plan to continue delivering groceries to their community as long as necessary.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Math teacher visits student’s front porch for some homework help

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

Courtesy Josh Anderson(MADISON, S.D.) — A South Dakota teacher is getting praise for going above and beyond to help a student with her math homework after schools switched to virtual learning because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Chris Waba, a sixth grade math teacher in Madison, South Dakota, said he had been emailing back and forth with a student to help her figure out a problem after a lesson he taught by Zoom earlier that day.

When the student, Rylee Anderson, 12, told him in an email that she was still struggling with the problem, Waba, a 27-year teaching veteran, grabbed a whiteboard he’d taken home with him from his classroom and walked to her front door.

“We had really tried to work through it digitally, but you can just tell when you need to do something else,” Waba told “Good Morning America.” I had the whiteboard that I brought home, and I just said, ‘I’ll be over in a couple of minutes.'”

Waba is a neighbor and very close friend of Rylee’s family, so he only had to walk a few doors down to reach her. He spent about 15 minutes kneeling outside the front door and drawing on the whiteboard while Rylee stood safely inside.

The moment was captured on camera by Rylee’s parents. Rylee’s dad, Josh Anderson, the head football coach at Dakota State University, posted the photo on Twitter, where it quickly went viral.

“He’s just a really good teacher and really good person,” Anderson said. “[Rylee] was shocked he came over, but she was happy to get it done and over with because she was very frustrated to not have the answers or the help that she needed.”

Schools in Madison switched to virtual learning nearly three weeks ago, according to Waba. He said the move has been an adjustment for teachers like himself as well as for students.

“When teachers go into the business, it’s because they like to teach and be around the kids,” he said. “For us now to turn into a virtual classroom, probably the biggest love of what our job is about isn’t our job anymore. It’s not the same as being in the classroom and interacting with class.”

Waba also stressed that there are teachers around the country going above and beyond for their students in this unprecedented time.

“I’m not one on an island,” he said. “There are thousands and thousands of teachers going the extra mile for their kids.”

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Math teacher visits student’s front porch for some homework help

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

Courtesy Josh Anderson(MADISON, S.D.) — A South Dakota teacher is getting praise for going above and beyond to help a student with her math homework after schools switched to virtual learning because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Chris Waba, a sixth grade math teacher in Madison, South Dakota, said he had been emailing back and forth with a student to help her figure out a problem after a lesson he taught by Zoom earlier that day.

When the student, Rylee Anderson, 12, told him in an email that she was still struggling with the problem, Waba, a 27-year teaching veteran, grabbed a whiteboard he’d taken home with him from his classroom and walked to her front door.

“We had really tried to work through it digitally, but you can just tell when you need to do something else,” Waba told “Good Morning America.” I had the whiteboard that I brought home, and I just said, ‘I’ll be over in a couple of minutes.'”

Waba is a neighbor and very close friend of Rylee’s family, so he only had to walk a few doors down to reach her. He spent about 15 minutes kneeling outside the front door and drawing on the whiteboard while Rylee stood safely inside.

The moment was captured on camera by Rylee’s parents. Rylee’s dad, Josh Anderson, the head football coach at Dakota State University, posted the photo on Twitter, where it quickly went viral.

“He’s just a really good teacher and really good person,” Anderson said. “[Rylee] was shocked he came over, but she was happy to get it done and over with because she was very frustrated to not have the answers or the help that she needed.”

Schools in Madison switched to virtual learning nearly three weeks ago, according to Waba. He said the move has been an adjustment for teachers like himself as well as for students.

“When teachers go into the business, it’s because they like to teach and be around the kids,” he said. “For us now to turn into a virtual classroom, probably the biggest love of what our job is about isn’t our job anymore. It’s not the same as being in the classroom and interacting with class.”

Waba also stressed that there are teachers around the country going above and beyond for their students in this unprecedented time.

“I’m not one on an island,” he said. “There are thousands and thousands of teachers going the extra mile for their kids.”

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Editorial Roundup: US

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

Excerpts from recent editorials in the United States and abroad:

———

March 31

The Japan News on countries working together to combat the new coronavirus pandemic:

There are limits to what any one country can do when it comes to responses to the new coronavirus. Unless the spread of infections can be contained worldwide, there will be no hope for putting an end to the pandemic, or for restoring the economy. International cooperation is more urgently needed than ever before.

More than 700,000 people have been infected with the virus globally. The U.S. caseload surged to the largest in the world, passing China with far over 100,000 cases. Infections have also been spreading in emerging and developing countries, including South Africa, Brazil and Thailand.

It is important to avoid a situation in which outbreaks of the virus swing back and forth between developed and developing countries. Areas in developing countries hit by poverty or conflict suffer poor hygienic environments. In…

Editorial Roundup: US

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

Excerpts from recent editorials in the United States and abroad:

———

March 31

The Japan News on countries working together to combat the new coronavirus pandemic:

There are limits to what any one country can do when it comes to responses to the new coronavirus. Unless the spread of infections can be contained worldwide, there will be no hope for putting an end to the pandemic, or for restoring the economy. International cooperation is more urgently needed than ever before.

More than 700,000 people have been infected with the virus globally. The U.S. caseload surged to the largest in the world, passing China with far over 100,000 cases. Infections have also been spreading in emerging and developing countries, including South Africa, Brazil and Thailand.

It is important to avoid a situation in which outbreaks of the virus swing back and forth between developed and developing countries. Areas in developing countries hit by poverty or conflict suffer poor hygienic environments. In…

AP Sources: US to deploy anti-drug Navy ships near Venezuela

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

The Trump administration will soon announce that the U.S. is moving newly-deployed naval ships toward the coast of Venezuela as it enhances counter-narcotic operations in the Caribbean following a U.S. indictment of Nicolás Maduro on drug charges

AP Sources: US to deploy anti-drug Navy ships near Venezuela

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

The Trump administration will soon announce that the U.S. is moving newly-deployed naval ships toward the coast of Venezuela as it enhances counter-narcotic operations in the Caribbean following a U.S. indictment of Nicolás Maduro on drug charges

Amid dire coronavirus warning, Navajo Nation ‘hunkered down,’ tribal president says

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

iStock/chapin31(SANTA FE, N.M.) — Just days after New Mexico’s governor warned President Trump that she feared the coronavirus could “wipe out” tribal nations, the president of the Navajo Nation told ABC News he believes aggressive measures being taken now will help contain the disease.

“We have a shelter-in-place here in Navajo Nation and have a curfew, and we are doing our best to slow down the spread or even stop the spread of coronavirus,” said Jonathan Nez, who was elected president of the tribal nation in 2018. “People are already in their houses and hunkered down.”

Nez said the shelter-in-place order is similar to those in a number of states now, advising residents to stay at home but allowing them out for necessities. “Curfew is a pretty much a lock-down from 8 p.m. on,” he said, noting officials are monitoring it with roadblocks.

The latest figures show 174 people have tested positive and seven have died in the tribal territory that spans portions of three western states and has a population of more than 250,000. Officials in New Mexico and Arizona have both expressed concerns about the ability of the Navajo Nation to contain an outbreak. This week the Arizona National Guard reportedly flew in doctors and supplies and helped set up a make-shift hospital with 50 beds.

On a call with President Trump and other governors, New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham said she was seeing “incredible spikes” of coronavirus cases in Navajo Nation.

“I’m very worried, Mr. President,” Grisham said Monday, according to a recording of the call obtained by ABC News. “The rate of infection, at least on the New Mexico side — although we’ve got several Arizona residents in our hospitals — we’re seeing a much higher hospital rate, a much younger hospital rate, a much quicker go-right-to-the-vent[ilator] rate for this population. And we’re seeing doubling in every day-and-a-half,” she said.

There is reason for concern, according to Hilary Tompkins, the former solicitor for the U.S. Department of the Interior, which serves the federal trustee for Native American tribes.

“The Native American population is particularly vulnerable not only due to underlying health disparities and high poverty rates, but also because many Indian reservations lack basic, modern day amenities such as running water, access to the internet, and connection with the electrical grid, which are vital during a pandemic,” Tompkins told ABC News.

Tompkins, a member of the Navajo Nation, said access to full-service healthcare is lacking during optimal conditions.

“These factors create a perfect storm for the virus to devastate tribal communities, which we are witnessing right now with my tribe, the Navajo Nation,” she said. “Our federal trustee must act quickly to support tribal leaders in their fight against the coronavirus in order to save the lives of First Americans.”

The outbreak of the virus in the reservation is believed to have spread at an evangelical church rally in Chilchinbeto, Arizona, on March 7, according to a Los Angeles Times report. The Navajo Nation government declared a state of emergency on March 13, one week later, before ultimately issuing a reservation-wide shelter-in-place order for all residents on March 20.

“In a short period of time, COVID-19 has arrived on the Navajo Nation and the number of cases are increasing at a high rate across the Nation,” the order said. “The purpose of the closure is to allow the Navajo Nation as a whole to isolate and quarantine.”

President Nez told ABC News he believes the tribal response is working.

“We’re really getting out the information, letting people know to take care of themselves so that we don’t have a large spike here at Navajo Nation,” Nez said. “We’re doing our best to educate people. We have our healthcare professionals going door to door.”

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Amid dire coronavirus warning, Navajo Nation ‘hunkered down,’ tribal president says

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

iStock/chapin31(SANTA FE, N.M.) — Just days after New Mexico’s governor warned President Trump that she feared the coronavirus could “wipe out” tribal nations, the president of the Navajo Nation told ABC News he believes aggressive measures being taken now will help contain the disease.

“We have a shelter-in-place here in Navajo Nation and have a curfew, and we are doing our best to slow down the spread or even stop the spread of coronavirus,” said Jonathan Nez, who was elected president of the tribal nation in 2018. “People are already in their houses and hunkered down.”

Nez said the shelter-in-place order is similar to those in a number of states now, advising residents to stay at home but allowing them out for necessities. “Curfew is a pretty much a lock-down from 8 p.m. on,” he said, noting officials are monitoring it with roadblocks.

The latest figures show 174 people have tested positive and seven have died in the tribal territory that spans portions of three western states and has a population of more than 250,000. Officials in New Mexico and Arizona have both expressed concerns about the ability of the Navajo Nation to contain an outbreak. This week the Arizona National Guard reportedly flew in doctors and supplies and helped set up a make-shift hospital with 50 beds.

On a call with President Trump and other governors, New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham said she was seeing “incredible spikes” of coronavirus cases in Navajo Nation.

“I’m very worried, Mr. President,” Grisham said Monday, according to a recording of the call obtained by ABC News. “The rate of infection, at least on the New Mexico side — although we’ve got several Arizona residents in our hospitals — we’re seeing a much higher hospital rate, a much younger hospital rate, a much quicker go-right-to-the-vent[ilator] rate for this population. And we’re seeing doubling in every day-and-a-half,” she said.

There is reason for concern, according to Hilary Tompkins, the former solicitor for the U.S. Department of the Interior, which serves the federal trustee for Native American tribes.

“The Native American population is particularly vulnerable not only due to underlying health disparities and high poverty rates, but also because many Indian reservations lack basic, modern day amenities such as running water, access to the internet, and connection with the electrical grid, which are vital during a pandemic,” Tompkins told ABC News.

Tompkins, a member of the Navajo Nation, said access to full-service healthcare is lacking during optimal conditions.

“These factors create a perfect storm for the virus to devastate tribal communities, which we are witnessing right now with my tribe, the Navajo Nation,” she said. “Our federal trustee must act quickly to support tribal leaders in their fight against the coronavirus in order to save the lives of First Americans.”

The outbreak of the virus in the reservation is believed to have spread at an evangelical church rally in Chilchinbeto, Arizona, on March 7, according to a Los Angeles Times report. The Navajo Nation government declared a state of emergency on March 13, one week later, before ultimately issuing a reservation-wide shelter-in-place order for all residents on March 20.

“In a short period of time, COVID-19 has arrived on the Navajo Nation and the number of cases are increasing at a high rate across the Nation,” the order said. “The purpose of the closure is to allow the Navajo Nation as a whole to isolate and quarantine.”

President Nez told ABC News he believes the tribal response is working.

“We’re really getting out the information, letting people know to take care of themselves so that we don’t have a large spike here at Navajo Nation,” Nez said. “We’re doing our best to educate people. We have our healthcare professionals going door to door.”

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

93 sailors have coronavirus on carrier, Navy will remove 2,700 sailors from ship

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

ABC News(NEW YORK) — The number of positive tests for the novel coronavirus aboard the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt has now risen to 93, according to acting Navy Secretary Thomas Modly, who added that the goal now is to move another 2,700 members of the ship’s crew of 5,000 ashore to Guam.

Testing of the ship’s crew continues as it is berthed in Guam, Modly said at a Pentagon news conference Wednesday. So far, 500 coronavirus tests have come back negative.

Modly said that about 1,000 sailors have been taken off the ship and that approximately 2,700 will eventually be taken off the ship in coming days.

He also said there are no plans to take all of the crewmembers off the ship as a number of them must remain aboard to deal with essentials like running the nuclear reactor and ensuring the safety of the weapons aboard.

Adm. Mike Gilday, the chief of naval operations, told reporters that about 1,000 sailors need to remain aboard the carrier to ensure those functions.

Modly emphasized that if the ship needs to head to sea for an emergency it still can do so — one reason why some crewmen will remain aboard.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

93 sailors have coronavirus on carrier, Navy will remove 2,700 sailors from ship

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

ABC News(NEW YORK) — The number of positive tests for the novel coronavirus aboard the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt has now risen to 93, according to acting Navy Secretary Thomas Modly, who added that the goal now is to move another 2,700 members of the ship’s crew of 5,000 ashore to Guam.

Testing of the ship’s crew continues as it is berthed in Guam, Modly said at a Pentagon news conference Wednesday. So far, 500 coronavirus tests have come back negative.

Modly said that about 1,000 sailors have been taken off the ship and that approximately 2,700 will eventually be taken off the ship in coming days.

He also said there are no plans to take all of the crewmembers off the ship as a number of them must remain aboard to deal with essentials like running the nuclear reactor and ensuring the safety of the weapons aboard.

Adm. Mike Gilday, the chief of naval operations, told reporters that about 1,000 sailors need to remain aboard the carrier to ensure those functions.

Modly emphasized that if the ship needs to head to sea for an emergency it still can do so — one reason why some crewmen will remain aboard.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

AP Sources: US to deploy anti-drug ships near Venezuela

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

The Trump administration will soon announce that the U.S. is moving newly-deployed naval ships toward the coast of Venezuela as it enhances counter-narcotic operations in the Caribbean following a U.S. indictment of Nicolás Maduro on drug charges

AP Sources: US to deploy anti-drug ships near Venezuela

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

The Trump administration will soon announce that the U.S. is moving newly-deployed naval ships toward the coast of Venezuela as it enhances counter-narcotic operations in the Caribbean following a U.S. indictment of Nicolás Maduro on drug charges

NYC map shows which neighborhoods have been hit hardest by coronavirus

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

New York City Health Department(NEW YORK) — New York City’s Health Department has released a detailed map of the city’s coronavirus cases, broken down by zip code.

The map uses data from up until March 31, when there were 38,396 confirmed cases in the city. Johns Hopkins University Medical Center says that as of April 1, New York City has 43,119 cases and 1,096 deaths.

The map shows that several locations in the boroughs outside Manhattan have the highest concentrations of COVID-19 cases, between 306 and 947.

Some of the hardest-hit neighborhoods include Elmhurst and Kew Gardens Hills in Queens, the South Bronx, and East New York in Brooklyn.

The map breaks down each zip code into one of four categories: 6-112 cases, 112-182 cases, 182-306 cases, and 306-947 cases.

Thirty-two of the city’s coronavirus patients have no known zip code, according to the data.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

NYC map shows which neighborhoods have been hit hardest by coronavirus

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

New York City Health Department(NEW YORK) — New York City’s Health Department has released a detailed map of the city’s coronavirus cases, broken down by zip code.

The map uses data from up until March 31, when there were 38,396 confirmed cases in the city. Johns Hopkins University Medical Center says that as of April 1, New York City has 43,119 cases and 1,096 deaths.

The map shows that several locations in the boroughs outside Manhattan have the highest concentrations of COVID-19 cases, between 306 and 947.

Some of the hardest-hit neighborhoods include Elmhurst and Kew Gardens Hills in Queens, the South Bronx, and East New York in Brooklyn.

The map breaks down each zip code into one of four categories: 6-112 cases, 112-182 cases, 182-306 cases, and 306-947 cases.

Thirty-two of the city’s coronavirus patients have no known zip code, according to the data.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Call for virus volunteers yields army of health care workers

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

An army of health care workers has heeded New York’s call for help reinforcing hospitals overwhelmed by the coronavirus pandemic

Call for virus volunteers yields army of health care workers

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

An army of health care workers has heeded New York’s call for help reinforcing hospitals overwhelmed by the coronavirus pandemic

Mercedes has worst Takata air bag recall completion rate

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

Mercedes is the laggard when it comes to recalling dangerous Takata air bag inflators

Mercedes has worst Takata air bag recall completion rate

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

Mercedes is the laggard when it comes to recalling dangerous Takata air bag inflators

A ‘Solidarity Menu’ for poor Colombians, migrant Venezuelans

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

Colombian restaurateur Emiliano Moscoso recently launched a program called “Solidarity Menu” to feed people in need during the coronavirus outbreak

A ‘Solidarity Menu’ for poor Colombians, migrant Venezuelans

Posted on: April 1st, 2020 by ABC News No Comments

Colombian restaurateur Emiliano Moscoso recently launched a program called “Solidarity Menu” to feed people in need during the coronavirus outbreak